Lonesome Nights – Wed, 11/30 @ Sahara Lounge

KOOP Radio, Thundercloud Subs & The Lonesome Stranger present Lonesome Nights, a monthly country night at Sahara Lounge. Join us every last Wednesday for live tunes & records spun by The Lonesome Stranger DJs & friends.

This November we’re joined by Sarah Barlow and the Heat, Larry Decaf’s Slow Pony and Clayton England.

$5 :: 21+ :: Records at 7

Party Stains – A Weekly Update from Stronger Than Dirt

Some FEATURED ARTISTS on this week’s Stronger Than Dirt (Saturday, September 3, 8-10pm) include Freddie and the Dreamers, Troggs, Screemer, Heavy Metal Kids, Pete Holly and the Looks, Whirlywirld, Chrisma, Sheena and the Rokkets, Taxi Girl, Les Bellas, lots of new music, as well as the weekly Dusty Diamond.

COVER ART OF THE WEEK: Terminal Mind were an underground rock band associated with the late 70s and early 80s punk scene in Austin. They had but one release while active, a 4-song EP that came out in 1979 on No Records. It featured the simple, straightforward design of bassist and vocalist Steve Marsh. The same artwork was used on the “Recordings” anthology, a collection of all their recorded output, live as well as studio. It appeared in 2018 on the Sonic Surgery label. Click on image to enlarge.

LAST WEEK’S DUSTY DIAMOND (a forgotten gem from the STD vaults): Gas Huffer were a garage rock band from Washington state and were active from 1991 until 2006. In that time, they released numerous albums and singles. They included Tom Price who was in the U-Men, Monkeywrench as well as other bands. “Hot Cakes” is an uptempo Seattle sounding garage romp that is not necessarily about one of my favorite breakfast foods. It appeared on the 1992 “Hot Cakes!” single on Sub Pop. Listen to it here:

Promo art from a 1980 Pete Holly and the Looks single on Bomp! Original design by Diane Zincavage and photo by Cruz Montoya.

Lonesome Nights – Wed, 7/27 – Sahara Lounge

KOOP Radio, Thundercloud Subs & The Lonesome Stranger present Lonesome Nights, a monthly country night at Sahara Lounge. Join us every last Wednesday for live tunes & records spun by The Lonesome Stranger DJs & friends.

Our 5th edition features live music from Guma, Dan & Christy Foster, and Sarah Barlow plus DJ Jammertime Jeremiah.

21+ :: $5 :: Records at 7

Artwork by Kayla Dockery

Is US Drone Warfare an Illegal & Immoral Extension of a Bellicose US Foreign Policy that Demands Ethical Accountability? – BLID – Mon, 10/25 @ 6 PM

Our guest Nick Mottern is a Vietnam veteran and has worked as a reporter, researcher, writer, and political organizer over the last 30 years. He manages a website devoted to education and organizing to stop drone warfare and surveillance www.KnowDrones.com. He was director of the 2012 national ‘Know Drones Tour’ and was an organizer of the 2013 April Days of Action and 2014 Spring Days of Action, and he publishes “The Drone Organizers Bulletin”. He provides stunning revelations & concerns.

Our show focus includes the immorality of drone warfare, the psychological trauma associated with drone operators, and the US public that is so abstracted from the realities of the victims and communities worldwide that are subject to such attacks. The Afghan War our guest argues would have been over a long time ago if it had not been for drones. The prosecution and inhumane conditions now facing Daniel Hale who despite the presiding judge’s recommendation resulted in him being sent to a supermax Marion prison. The prison conditions he faces are not commensurate with his ‘crime’. Daniel Hale is a whistleblower who did not put at risk US national security by releasing ‘confidential’ papers. He revealed to the US public:

1. for the first time the “kill chain,” the bureaucratic process by which targets are selected to be summarily executed.

2. information that helped to expose the existence of the secret programs & that drone strikes killed many more innocent people than their supposed “targets”, &

3. that US citizens have been killed extrajudicially by drone strikes in violation of their constitutional rights to a trial.

The reason Hale cited for pleading guilty is that the Espionage Act charges prevent a public interest defense. In other words, Hale’s lawyers were barred from arguing that the need of the public to be made aware of the criminal activities of the US government was more important than his obligation not to disclose classified information to anyone. Essentially Hale was forced to plead guilty in order to avoid potentially spending decades in federal prison. Whistleblowers are gagged from explaining their actions. Defense attorneys are barred from uttering the words “whistleblower” or “First Amendment” within earshot of the jury. Since all that matters for sustaining a conviction is that a defendant gave classified information to someone not entitled to receive it, that’s all the jury is allowed to hear. The result is often absolutely no accountability of US foreign policy crimes against humanity. Pgatos pgatos00@gmail.com 10/25/2021

If you are not careful, the newspapers will have you hating the people who are being oppressed and loving the people who are doing the oppressing. Malcolm X

A Beautiful Buzz at the Austin International Art Fair

A hard seltzer in my hand, harpist’s notes dancing in the air, and a literal world of art to explore – life was good on Labor Day at the Austin International Art Fair.

Abundant with a plethora of diverse pieces from thirty-two artists representing fifteen different countries, I was fortunate to behold the universality of our world’s need for artistic expression. At times I was almost brought to tears, and I surely doubt it was because of the seltzer. The collection featured a wide assortment of equally awe-inspiring styles, from the surreal workings of Salvador Dali’s Argillet Collection, the vibrant repetitive minimalism of Hunt Slonem, to the exuberant and child-like workings of Japanese artist Takashi Murakami. While I could write paragraph after paragraph of every painting that inspired me to genuinely enter a contemplative state, cross my arms, look deeply into the finer textures of a piece, and self-exclaim a soft whispering, “wow” out of sheer amazement and reverence, I would rather focus on and praise the work of local Austin artists: Matthew Trujillo and Mila Sketch.

Matthew Trujillo, originally from Las Cruces, New Mexico, now lives in Austin, TX, and continues to bless the city with his pop modern street-style portraits. My favorite piece of his that was on display, (pictured below) is titled Perseverance. I spent several seltzer-inspired minutes staring into the seemingly blood-stained eyes of the feminine demon icon. Why an association between demon and the word “perseverance’’? The more I wondered this, the more I was convinced that Trujillo used these heartful and heat-emitting colors of red, yellow, and orange to convey that, in order to truly persevere, one must be willing to endure sacrifices and forage ahead despite the risk of pain. Even the thought of horns growing out of one’s head reminds me of the need for patience when it comes to developing a skill or the quest for a new life. Like the horns, they will eventually break from underneath the skin, no doubt causing some discomfort, yet, once they are fully developed, the only work to be done is to revere their dangerous cosmetic allure. When I look into the eyes of Perseverance, I feel I am being asked to accept the inevitable need to draw blood, either from myself or from those (either person, institution, demon, etc.) who stand in my way, in order to attain the fulfillment of my passionate aspiration. In the case of Lucifer, the ultimate rebel, he must have had some conviction to dissent from the creator of the universe. I guess the message is to be more like Satan. Contrarily, perhaps the true test of perseverance is resisting the enticement of this sexual succubus’s beckoning gaze. It is our duty to face our own internal demons, reconcile with these failings, and carry on towards the light of perseverance. Every time the devil obscures our path towards progress, we exclaim, “Get behind me Satan!” and keep moving forward; however, if the devil is the seltzer, I think I’m failing. Sippy, sippy.

Perseverance by Matthew Trujillo

The second local talent whose work I found enlivening is Russian-born, award-winning artist Mila Sketch. I wonder if she changed her name because she’s an artist. Despite my suspicion, her work portrays more discipline than any simple sketch. My favorite work of hers (pictured below) is titled Flourishing. It depicts a vast array of patterns, symbols, colors, and dimensions emanating from the flames of a life-giving fire. The moon, the nurturer of the creative impulse, is also present looming over the explosive iridescence. This piece, in many ways, is an all-encompassing representation of the entire gallery event. If the fire is the universal creative instinct, whose flames contain even more patterns and mosaics, the flourishing comes from using this light to illuminate the unsuspecting, omnipresent beauty present all over the globe. The presence of the moon would suggest that it is nighttime, and within this darkness (either external or internal) there is the exploration of one’s consciousness, ripe with glitching patterns, sprouting lines, and rolling geometric hills of vibrant potentiality. It is the artist’s duty to harness that flame so they can flourish and work to transfigure their raw stimuli into an admirable form, thus giving light to darkness. Ironically, Sketch’s painting seems to both deny form, as it represents the artist’s underlying inspirations, while also demonstrating meticulous attention to detail in its many revelations. As I am sure one could imagine, this piece and my seltzer complimented each other nicely. Sip, sip.

Flourishing by Mila Sketch

Sipping aside, I soberly encourage every collector, enthusiast, critic, and dilettante to visit the Austin International Art Fair at the West Chelsea Contemporary Museum. It is our duty as a community, if we wish our vibrant art scene to continue to flourish, to support the artists who work so diligently to inspirit our everyday lives. The exhibit will be running until October 24th, and you can get more details from their website https://wcc.art/the-austin-international-art-fair/.

Do not forget to follow local artists Matthew Trujillo (@mattru22) and Mila Sketch (@mila_sketch) on Instagram.

By Bryce Robinson

Party Stains – A Weekly Update From Stronger Than Dirt

Some FEATURED ARTISTS on this week’s Stronger Than Dirt (Saturday, October 16, 8-10pm) include the the Move, Dana Gillespie, Blackfoot Sue, Milk ‘N’ Cookies, Devo, Wazmo Nariz, Dadistics, the Mystreated, some Greek synth wave and French post punk, lots of new music, as well as the weekly Dusty Diamond.

PICTURE SLEEVE OF THE WEEK: The Dadistics were a late 70s guitar based new wave band from Oak Park, IL. They had only a few singles, including “Modern Girl,” which appeared in 1980 on Quark Records, a subsidiary of Bomp! Records. The front and back cover art, harking back to vintage 40s and 50s pin-up and pulp art, was done by Fred and Suzanne Endsley. Fred was the band’s guitarist and wrote the music and words to “Modern Girl.”

LAST WEEK’S DUSTY DIAMOND (a forgotten gem from the STD vaults): The New Bomb Turks, a punk band from Columbus, OH, had numerous releases between 1992 and 2003, and still perform. They have a Dead Boys inspired sound infused with the energy of hardcore. “Tail Crush” is an absolute barn-burner, and epitomizes their tight, powerful, high energy and mosh friendly sound. It appeared originally in 1991 on a split EP with fellow Columbusites Gaunt on Datapanik Records. It was rerecorded, and appeared the next year on the “!!Destroy-Oh-Boy!! album on Crypt Records. On a side note, all four founding members had English degrees from Ohio State University, and guitarist Jim Weber now teaches high school English. Listen to the second version of “Tail Crush” here:

Promo art from the Jet Bumpers’ 1995 “Non Stop Pepsi Party” EP on Radio Blast Recordings. Artwork uncredited.

Party Stains – A Weekly Update From Stronger Than Dirt

Some FEATURED ARTISTS on this week’s Stronger Than Dirt (Saturday, October 9, 8-10pm) include the Monks, Steppenwolf, the Beat (US), Members, Josef K, Insect Surfers, Les Calamités, Elastica, and Pretty Please (Austin), lots of new music, as well as the weekly Dusty Diamond.

PICTURE SLEEVE OF THE WEEK: The Skoings were a short-lived L.A. based band with a proto punk sound that would have fit in with the Cleveland/Akron scene of the time. They had but one release, this single from 1977 on their own Vigilante label. At a time when albums dominated, and most American singles came packaged in plain company sleeves, the Skoings single pointed to the future. It was self-released, presaging the coming punk/new wave DIY revolution, and had a sleeve with a Devo-esque artistic aesthetic. It also came with an inner sheet (image on the right) with an illustration of the band in front of a very SoCal looking house, and lyrics on the back. The cover and inner sheet were done by Pad, and the cover photo was by Frank, Bob, and Pad, all band members.

LAST WEEK’S DUSTY DIAMOND (a forgotten gem from the STD vaults): The Registrators were a band out of Tokyo who were active from 1993-2004. Starting out as a pedal to the metal garage punk band, they evolved into a more produced, and poppier punk band. “Blank City” comes from the middle period of their evolution and hits a nice sweet spot. While it retains the energy and  production edge of the early years, it has a super catchy melody (replete with backing “ooooooh” vocals) and interesting guitar work. It appeared in 1998 on the “Sixteen Wires from the New Provocate” album on Rip Off Records. Listen to it here:

Promo art from an uncredited photo of the Monks circa 1966.

Party Stains – A Weekly Update From Stronger Than Dirt

Some FEATURED ARTISTS on this week’s Stronger Than Dirt (Saturday, October 2, 8-10pm) include the Kitchen Cinq (Amarillo!), the Sweet (see promo), Soft Boys, New Hearts, Tuxedomoon, Pointed Sticks, Miracle Workers, Mummies (pic sleeve), Ladytron, Thee Oh Sees, new music by Spit Kink (Buffalo), Famous Mammals (Oakland), Exercise (Austin), Why Bother? (Mason City IA), and Smirk (L.A.), as well as the weekly Dusty Diamond.

PICTURE SLEEVE OF THE WEEK: This is the record that gave the show its name. The Mummies were from San Bruno CA (near San Francisco) and played garage punk while dressed in ragged mummy costumes. While together for only a few years (1988-1992) their lo-fi sound, stage costumes, and general rebellious attitude (“F— CDs”) were a major influence on the 90s garage scene. The “Stronger Than Dirt” single featured (as did many of their releases) photos by Sven-Erik Geddes, owner of the garage label Planet Pimp Records. It appeared in 1992 on the Telstar label.

LAST WEEK’S DUSTY DIAMOND (a forgotten gem from the STD vaults): Dead Moon were a legendary garage rock and roll band from the Portland area that included the husband and wife team of Fred and Toody Cole. They had a stripped down sound with punk and occasional country influences, and their songs often dealt with dark themes. Active from 1987 until 2006, they had several releases, many on their own Tombstone label. “Graveyard” is classic Dead Moon, a scorching raw garage nugget about lost love. It appeared in 1988 on their first album “In the Graveyard” on Tombstone Records. Listen to it here:

Promo art from the Sweet’s “Blockbuster” single on RCA Records. Photo by Hipp.

Party Stains – A Weekly Update From Stronger Than Dirt

For this week’s Stronger Than Dirt (Saturday, September 25, 8-10pm) I will be featuring a few of my favorite tunes from the mid 60s up to the present day, including Pink Floyd, Peanut Butter Conspiracy, Bill Case (pic sleeve of the week), Chrome, Pere Ubu, Dead Moon, Hentchmen (see promo), Peach Kelli Pop, La Femme, Spread Joy, Melenas, Attic Ted, and many more. It’s a special fall membership drive show, so please consider pledging your support to KOOP radio and to the Saturday night party sounds of Stronger Than Dirt!

PICTURE SLEEVE OF THE WEEK: Here’s another pic sleeve chosen not for its artistic achievement (though the design is more than adequate), but rather as a relic from a 70s time capsule. Little is known about Bill Case (this was his only release), but the record itself was a side production project of Alan Blakley and Chip Hawkes of the Tremeloes. While both sides are great, “I’m Your Hero” is a monster track; it’s like Gary Glitter with fuzzed out psychedelic guitar. The single was released in 1977 in Germany on the Bellaphon label. Photo and design are uncredited.

Promo art from a Hentchmen’s 1995 single on Norton Recocords. Photo uncredited.

Party Stains – A Weekly Update From Stronger Than Dirt

This week’s Stronger Than Dirt (Saturday, September 18, 8-10pm) takes a look back at the year 1981. I will be featuring some of my favorite tunes from that year, including songs by the Shoes, Gun Club, Au Pairs, Suburban Lawns, the Embarrassment, Mission of Burma, Replacements, Girls at Our Best, Judy’s, the Jam, Standing Waves, Kraftwerk, and many more. It’s a special fall membership drive show, so please consider pledging your support to KOOP radio and to the party sounds of 1981!

PICTURE SLEEVE OF THE WEEK: The Embarrassment, from Wichita KS, described their punkish music as “blister pop,” and were one of my very favorite bands from that era. They were active from 1980 to 1983, releasing a single and two EPs in that time. Their self-titled EP from 1981 on Cynykyl Records featured an original lithograph by John Boyd.

LAST WEEK’S DUSTY DIAMOND (a forgotten gem from the STD vaults): Mama Guitar were a Japanese all-female garage band with occasional flashes of surf. They were active from 1999 until they disbanded in 2006. “Nice Present” is a fun dance-y beat number that would be perfect for your next mixer. It appeared originally in 1999 on the “Introducing… Mama Guitar” album on Captain Trip Records, as well on a 2000 EP on Wiped Out Records. Listen to it here:

Promo art from a reissue on Futurismo Records of Suburban Lawn’s s/t album from 1981. Photo by Charles Wharton.